5 Important Considerations When Planning For Structured Cabling

Planning for structured cabling can be one of the biggest challenges when it comes to setting up new building projects or adding wiring to existing structures. Done correctly, structured cabling can provide a building tenant with a cohesive system that offers uninterrupted service. Here are five important considerations when planning for structured cabling.

1. Indoor Vs. Outdoor
Will your cables be placed inside or outside? This decision has a big affect on the layout of your cables and the kind you use. Outdoor cables need to be installed in a specific way if they are to work as effectively as possible. On the other hand, indoor cables need to be installed in a manner that does not interrupt the aesthetic of the building.

Ask yourself this question: Have you considered the importance of using direct burial cables even in PVC in order to prevent major outages and digs in the event that cable is damaged by water, frost or other acts of nature?

 

2. What Kind Of Bandwidth Will You Require?
This is a huge concern for businesses that are going to be transmitting a large amount of data through their networks. If your structured cables cannot support the amount of bandwidth that your organization requires, it can lead to some serious issues and have a negative impact on the bottom line.

Ask yourself this question: You may have the newest and fastest hardware in the data center, but does your cabling support your head end today and into the future?

 

3. Moves, Adds, Changes and Your Furniture Locations
How well will your structured cables handle moves and changes, sometimes referred to as MACs? This is an aspect of planning for structured cabling that is critical to providing scalability and flexibility for the structure. If your structured cables do not support moves, it will be very limiting for the building’s tenants. Consider how likely it is that the cable layout in the building in question will need to be changed.

Where in your building will desks, conference tables, and server racks be located? This information plays a critical role in deciding how you go about planning the layout of your structured cabling. Certain kinds of furniture may support a specific type of cabling, which means you have to be certain that the cabling you install matches the furniture being used in the building. If not, it could lead to an unattractive office space or one that does not work as effectively as it could.

Ask yourself this question: Are you setting up for just what you have today or for what may come in the future?

 

4. Planning MDF and IDF Locations
Many people don’t realize that different cable types are limited as to how far they run. For instance, network cable isn’t supposed to run over 300 feet and if it is run further then signal can be lost to the devices at the edge.

For those less familiar with the term MDF and IDF, think of MDF as the hub for your equipment and IDF as the spokes. By properly planning where your head end system is and then planning for your spokes, you can make sure that cable runs are never too long and any changes down the line are less labor intensive.

Ask yourself this question: Have you planned for flexibility by putting your network closets in the right locations?

 

5. Government Regulations
Some states and cities require a specific kind of cabling system to be used based on the way that municipal power networks are set up. Be sure that you are well aware of any of these regulations before you start designing your structured cabling. If there are any doubts, get in touch with the governing body that oversees cabling regulations in your area and see what they say about rules that are in place about cabling.

Ask yourself this question: Do you know which cables need to be in conduit? How about which cables need to be plenum versus non-plenum?

 

Once you have been able to think about these and other considerations when planning for structured cabling, you can begin to move towards finalizing your design and getting your cabling installed. Be sure to work with a company that you can depend on to help you come up with a strategy for structured cabling and then execute it properly so that your cabling fits your budget as well as your operating needs.

At Pentegra Systems, we work closely with our clients to provide them the right audio, video, low voltage and collaboration technologies that support their business goals. Serving customers throughout Chicagoland, Pentegra aspires to be the first company you call for your system integration needs. Ready to learn more, connect with us here. We are happy to help!

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Benefits of Premise-Based Phone Systems vs. Hosted Phone Systems

In a world dominated by emailing, tweeting and text messaging, one device has continued to remain an intricate component of communication in business, the telephone. As easy as it may be to send a quick email instead of dialing the phone, there is no more effective method of communicating with another human being other than face-to-face than that of the phone. As far as technology has come, a telephone system is still a necessity in the workplace. When evaluating what VoIP phone system to implement in your workplace, it boils down to hosted vs. premise-based phone systems.  A premise-based phone system is one that is completely controlled and maintained within the business itself while a hosted phone system is one that is hosted in the cloud. In a time where most technology is migrating to the cloud, a phone system in house is still the more appealing option.             

Features

The most obvious starting point when choosing which system suits your business better is what features each has to offer. When researching various hosted phone systems, it’s obvious that they do not offer all of the features as the ones that are offered in premise-based. In most cases this is true as queues (automatic call lineup and routing) and IVRs (interactive voice response) are missing or at the very least, cost extra.  These additional features are more often than not already included with premise-based phone systems at no additional charge. If your business needs its critical business communication features, a premise-based system could ultimately be the way to go.

Control

It’s only natural preferring to have control over your assets. By choosing a premise-based phone system over one that resides in the cloud, the user will have more control and more flexibility. As it is when owning any type of asset, the owner has complete control over its use and operation. The premise-based phone system resides within your facility and is controlled and managed in-house as well making it much simpler to make necessary changes. Having to make any modification such as changing VoIP providers becomes much easier when you own your own PBX and it can be done much quicker as well.

Location

The provider’s location of a hosted phone system is more than likely hundreds or thousands of miles away. This large distance might cause certain latency for your phone system as well as the constant need for a powerful internet connection. Just one of the advantages of a premise-based phone system is the signaling over your own Local Area Network opposed to over the internet. All signaling occurs mere feet away. It’s common knowledge that the speed of the internet is never a constant. Having such a necessary tool as your telephone depending on the speed of your internet connection is an incredibly risky move.

Cost

One of, if not the largest factor that goes into a purchasing decision is the cost. Premise-based systems have up-front costs such as installation. In addition to purchasing the IP PBX, the customer will need to buy all handsets, gateways, routers as well as purchase the proper training for all employees. These costs can initially appear as quite a burden to small to medium sized businesses. However, as mentioned above premise-based phone systems more often than not include all of the premium features businesses need at no additional cost. Hosted phone systems require the user to purchase those extra features. In addition to paying for features, cloud providers also charge extra for service and maintenance costs and upgrades. Premise-based phone systems often include service and maintenance contracts when first purchasing the equipment. Depending on future issues with the system, the maintenance fees that come with a cloud-based system can pile up substantially over time in addition to your yearly or monthly service costs. The total cost of a premise-based phone system could appear large at first, but becomes quite appealing given the amount of years you plan on using it compared to the constant costs of a hosted phone system over that same time period.

As many services transition to the cloud, some services might actually be better off on the physical surface. However, any decision regarding the purchasing of an asset such as a phone system will always boil down to customer need. Phone system providers work with the customer to ensure that they are getting the proper system to fit each of their needs to improve everyday function of their business. Tell us about what type of phone system your company has and why in the comment section below!

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Benedictine University

Benedictine University

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Benedictine University was founded originally in Chicago in 1887, though has been situated on its present 108-acre campus in the western suburb of Lisle since 1901. In 2012, The Chronicle of Higher Education ranked Benedictine University as the No.1 fastest-growing campus in the country among ...

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